Celestial Chiraoscuro

An interesting new project called Satellite Lamps, by Einar Sneve Martinussen, Jørn Knutsen, and Timo Arnall, attempts to visualize the ever-drifting, never exactly accurate workings of GPS.

As the above video shows, the project uses “a set of lamps that contain GPS receivers, that change brightness according to the accuracy of received GPS signals. When we photograph them in timelapse, they reveal how the accuracy changes over time.”

You’re basically watching the indirect effects of signal drift, transformed here into ambient mood lighting that acts secondarily as a graph of celestial geography.

After Kitchen Confidential came out, I was 44. I was uninsured, I was broke and I was dunking fries into a fast food fryer. I understood that I got a pretty lucky break here and that it was statistically unlikely to happen again. I’ve been pretty careful about not f@cking up the opportunities that have comes since.
What’s the moral here? For years, pundits and politicians have insisted that guaranteed health care is an impossible dream, even though every other advanced country has it. Covering the uninsured was supposed to be unaffordable; Medicare as we know it was supposed to be unsustainable. But it turns out that incremental steps to improve incentives and reduce costs can achieve a lot, and covering the uninsured isn’t hard at all. When it comes to ensuring that Americans have access to health care, the message of the data is simple: Yes, we can.
brycedotvc:

This week the White House hosted their first ever Maker Faire.
You didn’t read about it on Techcrunch. Or Mashable.
But make no mistake, this was an historic event.
I recall running into Dale Daugherty, founder and CEO of Maker Media and spiritual leader of the maker movement shortly after President Obama’s 2009 inaugural speech. Dale giddily asked “did you hear it? I knew exactly what he was referring to. In that speech the president stated:
"Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted, for those that prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things"
There it was.
We are Makers. A nation of them.
At that time, the Maker movement was still very much in its infancy, still deep within the realm of hobbyists and hackers.
This week the President welcomed these makers of things to the most prominent address in the world. To set up shop. To display their work. To remind a nation of their history and call them to action. He said:
“Our parents and our grandparents created the world’s largest economy and strongest middle class not by buying stuff, but by building stuff — by making stuff, by tinkering and inventing and building.”
 I ran into Dale again last night. With eyes still a bit starry he tried to convey what this week meant to him and to the Maker movement. The words didn’t come easily, but there was a clear sense that this was a meaningful moment.
What began as a group of misunderstood hackers, artists and outcasts has transformed into the promise of a nation. And stands as a beacon signaling that real, tangible innovation is taking root on our soil once again. Tho the halls of the White House have been cleared of any signs of this weeks Maker Faire, those halls have clearly left a lasting mark on this community which left Dale, understandably, a bit speechless.

brycedotvc:

This week the White House hosted their first ever Maker Faire.

You didn’t read about it on Techcrunch. Or Mashable.

But make no mistake, this was an historic event.

I recall running into Dale Daugherty, founder and CEO of Maker Media and spiritual leader of the maker movement shortly after President Obama’s 2009 inaugural speech. Dale giddily asked “did you hear it? I knew exactly what he was referring to. In that speech the president stated:

"Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted, for those that prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things"

There it was.

We are Makers. A nation of them.

At that time, the Maker movement was still very much in its infancy, still deep within the realm of hobbyists and hackers.

This week the President welcomed these makers of things to the most prominent address in the world. To set up shop. To display their work. To remind a nation of their history and call them to action. He said:

“Our parents and our grandparents created the world’s largest economy and strongest middle class not by buying stuff, but by building stuff — by making stuff, by tinkering and inventing and building.”


I ran into Dale again last night. With eyes still a bit starry he tried to convey what this week meant to him and to the Maker movement. The words didn’t come easily, but there was a clear sense that this was a meaningful moment.

What began as a group of misunderstood hackers, artists and outcasts has transformed into the promise of a nation. And stands as a beacon signaling that real, tangible innovation is taking root on our soil once again. Tho the halls of the White House have been cleared of any signs of this weeks Maker Faire, those halls have clearly left a lasting mark on this community which left Dale, understandably, a bit speechless.

This song is Copyrighted in U.S., under Seal of Copyright #154085, for a period of 28 years, and anybody caught singin’ it without our permission, will be mighty good friends of ourn, cause we don’t give a dern. Publish it. Write it. Sing it. Swing to it. Yodel it. We wrote it, that’s all we wanted to do.
Once we have surrendered our senses and nervous systems to the private manipulation of those who would try to benefit by taking a lease on our eyes and ears and nerves, we don’t really have any rights left.